Before-and-after Craniosynostosis result photos

A Less Invasive Technique for Babies with Craniosynostosis

Surgical treatment of craniosynostosis has been around since the 1890s, and the traditional surgical procedure involves making a large incision in the scalp and total or sub-total removal of the skull. Following this, the skull is reshaped and replaced with a variety of materials. As a result of the invasive nature of this procedure, it can result in significant swelling, pain, and bleeding, and it often requires blood transfusions and three to five days of hospitalization.

Endoscopic Strip Craniectomy

In the early 1990s, David F. Jimenez, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon, began developing the endoscopic strip craniectomy -- a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat craniosynostosis. The fundamental approach of the procedure he developed, endoscopic strip craniectomy, is to operate on the patient with craniosynostosis as early as possible. The prematurely closed suture is released, allowing the rapidly growing brain to naturally remodel the skull and face to a normal shape.

Sagittal Suture Synostosis

The endoscopic treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis is done via two small incisions. One is placed behind the anterior fontanel (soft spot) and the other is placed further back on the head. The endoscopes are used to expose the areas above and below the skull, including the affected suture. Also, with endoscopic aid, the involved bone is removed, thereby freeing the brain and the skull to expand normally.

At the Center for Endoscopic Craniosynostosis Surgery in San Antonio, Texas, Dr. Jimenez continues his groundbreaking work. As the pioneer of the technique, he has performed the procedure more than any other surgeon in the world. Children from all over the world have come to San Antonio, Texas to benefit from the unmatched experience of Dr. Jimenez.

Pediatric Craniosynostosis Team

Dr. David Jimenez

Dr. David F. Jimenez
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery

 Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz

Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz, MD, FRCS
Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Internationally-recognized pediatric neurosurgeon David F. Jimenez, M.D developed the Endoscopic-Assisted Craniectomy more than two decades ago. His goal was to decrease complications, surgical trauma and blood transfusions in children in need of treatment for craniosynostosis. In addition to being a renowned surgeon, he is also a parent, who knows he would not want his child to have to undergo a major surgery if excellent results could be achieved in a less invasive way.










 

A Less Invasive Technique for Babies with Craniosynostosis

Surgical treatment of craniosynostosis has been around since the 1890s, and the traditional surgical procedure involves making a large incision in the scalp and total or sub-total removal of the skull. Following this, the skull is reshaped and replaced with a variety of materials. As a result of the invasive nature of this procedure, it can result in significant swelling, pain, and bleeding, and it often requires blood transfusions and three to five days of hospitalization.

Endoscopic Strip Craniectomy

In the early 1990s, David F. Jimenez, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon, began developing the endoscopic strip craniectomy -- a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat craniosynostosis. The fundamental approach of the procedure he developed, endoscopic strip craniectomy, is to operate on the patient with craniosynostosis as early as possible. The prematurely closed suture is released, allowing the rapidly growing brain to naturally remodel the skull and face to a normal shape.

Best results are obtained when the baby receives the procedure by 12 weeks of age. However, very good outcomes can be obtained for older babies, with appropriate postoperative helmet therapy.

At the Center for Endoscopic Craniosynostosis Surgery in San Antonio, Texas, Dr. Jimenez continues his groundbreaking work. As the pioneer of the technique, he has performed the procedure more than any other surgeon in the world.

Pediatric Craniosynostosis Team

Dr. David Jimenez

Dr. David F. Jimenez
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery

 Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz

Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz, MD, FRCS
Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Internationally-recognized pediatric neurosurgeon David F. Jimenez, M.D developed the Endoscopic-Assisted Craniectomy more than two decades ago. His goal was to decrease complications, surgical trauma and blood transfusions in children in need of treatment for craniosynostosis. In addition to being a renowned surgeon, he is also a parent, who knows he would not want his child to have to undergo a major surgery if excellent results could be achieved in a less invasive way.










 

Craniosynostosis Before & After Photos

In the early 1990s, David F. Jimenez, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon, began developing the endoscopic strip craniectomy -- a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat craniosynostosis. As the pioneer of the technique, he has performed the procedure more than any other surgeon in the world. Children from all over the world have come to San Antonio, Texas to benefit from the unmatched experience of Dr. Jimenez.

We have compiled photo galleries showing results from this technique on different types of craniosynostosis.

View Before and After Photos For:

Sagittal Suture Craniosynostosis 
Coronal Suture Craniosynostosis 
Metopic Suture Craniosynostosis
Multi-suture Craniosynostosis

Pediatric Craniosynostosis Team

Dr. David Jimenez

Dr. David F. Jimenez
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery

 Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz

Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz, MD, FRCS
Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Internationally-recognized pediatric neurosurgeon David F. Jimenez, M.D developed the Endoscopic-Assisted Craniectomy more than two decades ago. His goal was to decrease complications, surgical trauma and blood transfusions in children in need of treatment for craniosynostosis. In addition to being a renowned surgeon, he is also a parent, who knows he would not want his child to have to undergo a major surgery if excellent results could be achieved in a less invasive way.










 

A Less Invasive Technique for Babies with Craniosynostosis

Surgical treatment of craniosynostosis has been around since the 1890s, and the traditional surgical procedure involves making a large incision in the scalp and total or sub-total removal of the skull. Following this, the skull is reshaped and replaced with a variety of materials. As a result of the invasive nature of this procedure, it can result in significant swelling, pain, and bleeding, and it often requires blood transfusions and three to five days of hospitalization.

Endoscopic Strip Craniectomy

In the early 1990s, David F. Jimenez, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon, began developing the endoscopic strip craniectomy -- a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat craniosynostosis. The fundamental approach of the procedure he developed, endoscopic strip craniectomy, is to operate on the patient with craniosynostosis as early as possible. The prematurely closed suture is released, allowing the rapidly growing brain to naturally remodel the skull and face to a normal shape.

Best results are obtained when the baby receives the procedure by 12 weeks of age. However, very good outcomes can be obtained for older babies, with appropriate postoperative helmet therapy.

At the Center for Endoscopic Craniosynostosis Surgery in San Antonio, Texas, Dr. Jimenez continues his groundbreaking work. As the pioneer of the technique, he has performed the procedure more than any other surgeon in the world.

Pediatric Craniosynostosis Team

Dr. David Jimenez

Dr. David F. Jimenez
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery

 Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz

Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz, MD, FRCS
Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Internationally-recognized pediatric neurosurgeon David F. Jimenez, M.D developed the Endoscopic-Assisted Craniectomy more than two decades ago. His goal was to decrease complications, surgical trauma and blood transfusions in children in need of treatment for craniosynostosis. In addition to being a renowned surgeon, he is also a parent, who knows he would not want his child to have to undergo a major surgery if excellent results could be achieved in a less invasive way.










 

What is Craniosynostosis?

It is very common for a newborn baby to have a misshapen head immediately after birth. This can be caused by the position of the baby in the womb or by the pressure of the birth canal during delivery. In these cases, the shape should begin to resolve in the first couple of days of life. A persistent misshapen head should be evaluated for craniosynostosis, a relatively common condition occurring in as many as one in one thousand births.

To understand craniosynostosis, it’s important to first appreciate the changes happening inside a newborn’s brain. Immediately following birth, the baby’s brain undergoes an extremely rapid phase of growth and development. It is calculated that the volume and size of the newborn’s brain will double in size in nine months and triple in size in 36 months. In order to accommodate such rapid brain growth, your baby’s skull cap must expand rapidly as well. Rather than being one single large piece of bone, his/her skull is made up of several bones (frontal, parietal, occipital, squamosal) which are held together by fibrous-like hinges called “sutures.” These sutures respond to brain growth by “stretching” and producing new bone, thereby allowing the skull to grow along with the underlying brain.

Should any of these sutures close or fuse before birth or soon after, while the brain is growing, craniosynostosis occurs. The term cranial stenosis and simply synostosis are used to describe this condition. Because the brain is normal, it continues to grow at its programmed rapid rate. However, the closed suture delays proper and parallel bone growth which leads the brain to take the path of least resistance and ultimately the shape of the brain, skull and even face become distorted. Each suture premature closure will lead to a specific abnormal head shape and unique set of problems.

Misshapen Head

If you are concerned about your newborn’s head appearing misshapen or flat, we are happy to provide an initial opinion at no-cost through email with photographs. Please contact us for instructions.

Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment

In the early 1990s, David F. Jimenez, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon, began developing the endoscopic strip craniectomy -- a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat craniosynostosis. As the pioneer of the technique, he has performed the procedure more than any other surgeon in the world. Children from all over the world have come to San Antonio, Texas to benefit from the unmatched experience of Dr. Jimenez.

Pediatric Craniosynostosis Team

Dr. David Jimenez

Dr. David F. Jimenez
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery

 Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz

Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz, MD, FRCS
Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Internationally-recognized pediatric neurosurgeon David F. Jimenez, M.D developed the Endoscopic-Assisted Craniectomy more than two decades ago. His goal was to decrease complications, surgical trauma and blood transfusions in children in need of treatment for craniosynostosis. In addition to being a renowned surgeon, he is also a parent, who knows he would not want his child to have to undergo a major surgery if excellent results could be achieved in a less invasive way.










 

A Less Invasive Technique for Babies with Craniosynostosis

Surgical treatment of craniosynostosis has been around since the 1890s, and the traditional surgical procedure involves making a large incision in the scalp and total or sub-total removal of the skull. Following this, the skull is reshaped and replaced with a variety of materials. As a result of the invasive nature of this procedure, it can result in significant swelling, pain, and bleeding, and it often requires blood transfusions and three to five days of hospitalization.

Endoscopic Strip Craniectomy

In the early 1990s, David F. Jimenez, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon, began developing the endoscopic strip craniectomy -- a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat craniosynostosis. The fundamental approach of the procedure he developed, endoscopic strip craniectomy, is to operate on the patient with craniosynostosis as early as possible. The prematurely closed suture is released, allowing the rapidly growing brain to naturally remodel the skull and face to a normal shape.

Coronal Synostosis

Dissection endoscopic release of the closed coronal suture is performed via a small single incision located halfway between the soft spot and the ear on the involved side. In all cases, only a very small amount of hair is removed. The stenosed suture is resected with bone cutting scissors and instruments. Unlike traditional treatment, facial and orbital swelling is not seen and minimal pain is experienced by the patients.

At the Center for Endoscopic Craniosynostosis Surgery in San Antonio, Texas, Dr. Jimenez continues his groundbreaking work. As the pioneer of the technique, he has performed the procedure more than any other surgeon in the world. Children from all over the world have come to San Antonio, Texas to benefit from the unmatched experience of Dr. Jimenez.

Pediatric Craniosynostosis Team

Dr. David Jimenez

Dr. David F. Jimenez
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery

 Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz

Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz, MD, FRCS
Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Internationally-recognized pediatric neurosurgeon David F. Jimenez, M.D developed the Endoscopic-Assisted Craniectomy more than two decades ago. His goal was to decrease complications, surgical trauma and blood transfusions in children in need of treatment for craniosynostosis. In addition to being a renowned surgeon, he is also a parent, who knows he would not want his child to have to undergo a major surgery if excellent results could be achieved in a less invasive way.










 

A Less Invasive Technique for Babies with Craniosynostosis

Surgical treatment of craniosynostosis has been around since the 1890s, and the traditional surgical procedure involves making a large incision in the scalp and total or sub-total removal of the skull. Following this, the skull is reshaped and replaced with a variety of materials. As a result of the invasive nature of this procedure, it can result in significant swelling, pain, and bleeding, and it often requires blood transfusions and three to five days of hospitalization.

Endoscopic Strip Craniectomy

In the early 1990s, David F. Jimenez, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon, began developing the endoscopic strip craniectomy -- a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat craniosynostosis. The fundamental approach of the procedure he developed, endoscopic strip craniectomy, is to operate on the patient with craniosynostosis as early as possible. The prematurely closed suture is released, allowing the rapidly growing brain to naturally remodel the skull and face to a normal shape.

Metopic Suture Synostosis

The treatment of metopic suture synostosis is done via a single incision placed behind the hair line and across the mid-line. The endoscopes are used to elevate the scalp over the suture from the anterior fontanel down to the root of the nose (nasion). Once a small opening is made on the skull, the endoscopes are inserted under the bone and used to visualize the bone under the affected suture. A small strip of bone (0.7mm) is typically removed from the anterior fontanel to nasion, thereby releasing the closed stenosed suture.

At the Center for Endoscopic Craniosynostosis Surgery in San Antonio, Texas, Dr. Jimenez continues his groundbreaking work. As the pioneer of the technique, he has performed the procedure more than any other surgeon in the world. Children from all over the world have come to San Antonio, Texas to benefit from the unmatched experience of Dr. Jimenez.

Pediatric Craniosynostosis Team

Dr. David Jimenez

Dr. David F. Jimenez
Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery

 Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz

Dr. Izabela Tarasiewicz, MD, FRCS
Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery

Internationally-recognized pediatric neurosurgeon David F. Jimenez, M.D developed the Endoscopic-Assisted Craniectomy more than two decades ago. His goal was to decrease complications, surgical trauma and blood transfusions in children in need of treatment for craniosynostosis. In addition to being a renowned surgeon, he is also a parent, who knows he would not want his child to have to undergo a major surgery if excellent results could be achieved in a less invasive way.